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Championship Productions Featured Items!

older | 1 | .... | 4 | 5 | (Page 6)

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    VD-05010A: with Bond Shymansky,
    University of Iowa Head Coach;
    former Marquette University Head Coach; 2013 Big East Champs;
    former Georgia Tech Head Volleyball Coach; 2004 ACC Coach of the Year

    University of Iowa head volleyball coach, Bond Shymansky, guides you through the process of creating moments in practice that your players will see repeatedly in match play to prepare them to make adjustments on the fly, play as a cohesive unit, and win points for your team.

    Coach Shymansky walks you through the basics of four defensive systems: perimeter, middle, right up, and rotation. He highlights the strengths and weakness of each defense. Along with his University of Iowa team, Coach Shymansky demonstrates the situations your team will face while playing each defense and what to look for when making in-game switches between different systems.

    Blocking Scenarios

    You'll develop an understanding of what the blockers' responsibilities are in the defensive systems and how the defense behind them will adjust. Coach Shymansky explains how the defense adjusts when there is a hole in the block due to the blocker being late or not getting there at all. This happens a lot in games, and if your team is prepared for the situation, they will be more likely to get a dig and run an offense off of it.

    Transition Movement

    Coach Shymansky covers transition from a dig and what a team should do if the blockers switch after an offensive attack. He answers the question, "How can we be prepared defensively to be dynamic even when they have control of a swing or an attack that we just made?"

    Swing Block Movement

    You will learn how to properly execute the swing block. Additionally, your players will discover what they need to do when they're late and how to make a good block movement so they can get their hands across the net. Coach Shymansky demonstrates a one-foot crossover swing block that is used when the blocker is going to be late. You will also learn how to get the rest of the defense to react to the blockers.

    Installation of Defenses During Games

    Discover valuable ways to make a defensive system change in the middle of a set. Coach Shymansky explains how the use of hand signals and verbal cues can be used to change defenses in the middle of a match, so players know when and how to change and everyone's on the same page.

    Installation of Blocking Schemes

    Coach Shymansky explains what the different blocking schemes are and when to utilize them in the middle of a match. He covers the commit block, spread block and bunch read block. You'll learn when to make pre-service adjustments based on the opponent's rotation, hot hitter or go-to hitter, which will help your team get better prepared to block. Coach Shymansky also covers what middles need to do, how they communicate with the back row and what back row adjustments need to be made defensively.

    Defending the Back Row Attack

    One of the most confusing philosophies in volleyball is how to defend the back row attack. Coach Shymansky gives an explanation on how to defend it and explains the duties of the front row and the duties of the back and how they differ from normal defense.

    Everyone has heard the phrase defense wins championships. The philosophies and tips in this video will help your team's defense get you more points.

    "I have been looking for something like this for a long time. This is something that I have been missing as a coach and I can guarantee many varsity and college coaches will feel the same way. This is an easy to follow and understand hand book of team dynamic defense." - Customer Review

    74 minutes. 2016.



    VD-05010B: with Bond Shymansky,
    University of Iowa Head Coach;
    former Marquette University Head Coach; 2013 Big East Champs;
    former Georgia Tech Head Volleyball Coach; 2004 ACC Coach of the Year

    Bond Shymansky breaks down the components you need to have a more explosive offense. It all starts with ball control of the passers, arc points and tempo of the setters, and speed and power of the hitters. For a team to be more explosive, they need to attack out of more zones at multiple tempos. Coach Shymansky shows all the net zones - from zone 1 to 9 - for each hitter to attack. Additionally, he covers transition from defense to offense for each front row player.

    First Contact Ball Control

    See what is needed from the first contact in order to run an explosive offense. Coach Shymansky covers two main points: Pass height and where the setter should take the ball in relation to the net and their body. He focuses on the arc point of the pass and what is necessary to keep a fast tempo, as well as how to push tempo and make your technique explosive.

    First Contact Speed

    Coach Shymansky introduces three types of transition footwork for hitters. The goal is to get hitters to be explosive off the net. You will learn how to teach efficient transitional footwork for left side, right side and middles hitters that is precise and explosive.

    Arm Swing

    With his players, Coach Shymansky demonstrates the mechanics of the proper arm swing. This detail is often overlooked by coaches. The misconception is if a player is hitting hard, they must have a proper arm swing. However, a hard hitter may not be using a swing that will allow for an explosive offense.

    Hitting Position

    You will learn the different types of attacks each hitter can run in an explosive offense. Coach Shymansky demonstrates the different hitting options for left, right and middle hitters. You'll learn different tempos of hits and hits from different locations on the net. Coach Shymansky even shows where hitters should take off from.

    In order for an offense to be explosive, teams must work the different net zones and different tempos. Moving along the net zones for attacks will give hitters a 1-on-1 situation they can exploit. Multiple types of attacks are provided from each zone on the net.

    Serve Receive

    Learn how to have plays prepared when a good pass out of serve receive takes place. Coach Shymansky explains five combo plays. In each combo play, he explains who your team should try to pick on defensively, where you can get kills from, and which blockers you should try to put pressure on.

    Transition

    Learn how to run an explosive offense out of transition. This is valuable in the middle of a rally when your team gets a free ball or a perfect dig out of defense. Coach Shymansky covers how the play should be called and who should be calling it.

    All coaches want their offense to be more explosive and complicated to defend. This video will help give you an understanding of how to control the tempo of a game by developing technical components and system components and then tailoring them to your best situational coaching.

    "I have been a coach for 14 years. Been to the state final four 4 times and found this video so helpful." - Customer Review

    66 minutes. 2016.



    VD-05010C: with Bond Shymansky,
    University of Iowa Head Coach;
    former Marquette University Head Coach; 2013 Big East Champs;
    former Georgia Tech Head Volleyball Coach; 2004 ACC Coach of the Year

    How well do you prepare for tight sets in the 20s?

    A team that has a well-prepared plan has a much better chance to carry it out and get the win during the most crucial part of a match - the last five points. Bond Shymansky explains his philosophies of how to win a match when both teams score in the 20s. He goes into great detail on how to game plan, organize your offense, how to react to losing a point or bad calls, game management and more.

    Expectations

    You'll learn what a coach and player should expect when preparing for crunch time of a set. Knowing your team's thresholds and limitations is crucial. Coach Shymansky explains:

    • What coaches need to know about their players
    • What players need to know about themselves
    • Why players need to know what is expected of them

    How to React to Losing a Point or a Bad Call by the Referee

    This is a situation that needs to be rehearsed in practice. Coach Shymansky discusses how to react when there's a bad call, as well as what the floor captain and coaching staff should do to get ready for the next point. He discusses how players need to react and how to train reactions in practice. Additionally, you'll get strategies on how to handle a player after they commit an error in the 20s, and what to do in team huddles after points are won or lost.

    Identifying the "Serial Killer"

    Identifying the "serial killer" (go-to player) is important when closing out a game. Your setter should know who to feed and who will give the team the best chance to score points. Coach Shymansky goes over what that player's mindset needs to be and the rest of the team as well. He also covers what needs to be done to prepare to defend the opponent's serial killer.

    Scripting Plays

    Discover the importance of scripting plays so your team is prepared to score points during crunch time. Coach Shymansky covers different scenarios and how to prepare your team for them. He explains examples of what to do on free balls, when there is a mismatch, and how to communicate this information to players during the match.

    Tempo

    You'll learn how to recognize the tempo your team is playing at. Coach Shymansky explains how to make changes when your teams tempo slows down and the positive and negative effects of slow and fast tempo play.

    Game Management

    Prepare yourself as a coach to win the last five points of a set. Being prepared can help you react and make the right decisions to help your team win. Coach Shymansky discusses:

    • How to act and react
    • How to monitor how you act and react
    • How to practice timeouts in crucial parts of the game
    • Sub management
    • How to use subs to slow the other team down
    • How to use subs as a strategy piece to give instructions and feedback to your players

    Sometime you win or lose a point in crucial times, but knowing how to react to a bad call, great kill or service error will prepare your team to be ready for the next point.

    44 minutes. 2016.




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    with Nancy Dorsey,
    St. James Academy (KS) Head Coach;
    2015 AVCA National High School Coach of the Year;
    2015 Kansas Class 5A state champions;
    nine state titles in eleven years 2008-18 (finished runner up twice);
    2x PrepVolleyball.com National Champions (2013, 2010);
    VBM 2013 High School Team of the Year; American Family Insurance 2013 All-USA Volleyball Coach of the Year;
    won 56 straight matches from 2012-13; lost only one set in 2013 (finishing 96-1); over 420 career wins

    Every minute of practice is valuable. Using these minutes wisely to build the strength, conditioning, speed and agility of the players is necessary to be a successful team.

    Nancy Dorsey, 2015 AVCA National High School Coach of the Year, creates a straightforward way to plan, teach, and execute speed and agility drills for volleyball. These drills will make your players more coordinated, balanced, explosive, and fast - and with limited space and equipment requirements! Many high school or club volleyball programs have limited space, dollars and equipment. This video gives you creative ways to get great results.

    Coach Dorsey uses a combination of 70+ drills to teach agility, balance, coordination, speed, and power. Using players from her high school team - from the freshman level to the varsity level - she takes the time to explain each workout. You'll get in-depth descriptions and examples of what each drill looks like, what good and bad examples are, and how long to do each drill.

    Drills for Conditioning, Speed and Agility in the Gym

    Learn how to uses the gym to your advantage. Coach Dorsey demonstrates multiple drills that can work an entire team with the use of ladders, hurdles, bands, cones, and their own body weight. Her drills are designed to improve lateral and vertical performance on the court.

    Core Workouts

    Every skill a volleyball player performs relies on a player's core strength. With a stronger core, athletes can move and react better. Coach Dorsey demonstrates five different sets of core drills. She uses combinations that will allow you to keep the mix of core workouts during practice fresh. The correct form and technique are covered, with examples shown from beginner through the more advanced version of the drills.

    Strength Training in the Weight Room

    Any team with a weight room available will benefit from this segment of the video. Coach Dorsey demonstrates eight stations with three different exercises per station. In total there are 24 different variations of strength training exercises demonstrated. You'll get a great circuit for any team doing a summer program prior to the fall season.

    This is a jam-packed resource for any coach looking for volleyball-specific strength and conditioning ideas. All coaches will find something new to add to their training program. Teams using the information from this video will have an arsenal of strength, conditioning, speed and agility workouts available to improve the athleticism of any player.

    97 minutes. 2016.


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    with Nancy Dorsey,
    St. James Academy (KS) Head Coach;
    2015 AVCA National High School Coach of the Year;
    2015 Kansas Class 5A state champions;
    nine state titles in eleven years 2008-18 (finished runner up twice);
    2x PrepVolleyball.com National Champions (2013, 2010);
    VBM 2013 High School Team of the Year; American Family Insurance 2013 All-USA Volleyball Coach of the Year;
    won 56 straight matches from 2012-13; lost only one set in 2013 (finishing 96-1); over 420 career wins

    Use your practice time as efficiently as possible. Nancy Dorsey shows you how with a complete arsenal of fast-paced drills that are easily integrated into any high school practice plan. She also shares several progressions and adjustments for different levels of players.

    Using players on the court, Coach Dorsey demonstrates 11 drills that touch on all aspects of the game. She shows drills that get players involved and moving throughout the entire practice. She makes every drill competitive to simulate a game-like situation, and conditions the players through the various drills. Coach Dorsey explains how each drill can be simplified for less experienced players or made more challenging for advanced players.

    Coach Dorsey shows six drills that focus on passing skills. These drills give passers multiple reps, passing in all different types of situations. Players are pushed out of their comfort zones as they compete in drills where a specific goal must be achieved. These drills pit passers against passers, and servers against passers. Some are done cooperatively to teach players how to work together to accomplish a common purpose. As an added value, these drills condition players, saving time in practice where conditioning sessions usually take place.

    The next segment of drills, which works the offense and defense together, focuses on the attacking aspect of the game while having the defense work against the hitters. These drills also give players a chance to practice multiple positions on the floor, defensively and offensively.

    Coach Dorsey explains that scrimmaging without a purpose in practice will not help players improve. She introduces a game called Baseball that challenges teams in all six rotations while keeping things extremely fun. This drill provides the same intensity as scrimmaging but in a more purpose-driven way allowing coaches opportunities to stop the action and make points and corrections.

    This presentation single-handedly gives coaches a complete practice that involves all players and all aspects of the game. Players get an incredibly powerful conditioning workout while being pushed to their limits.

    111 minutes. 2014.


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    featuring drills from Bryan Bunn, Teri Clemens, Todd Dagenais, John Dunning, Christy Johnson-Lynch, Tom Keating and Lizzy Stemke

    This video is a complete toolbox of setting drills that will greatly enhance your practice library. Compiled from the best setting videos in Championship Productions' extensive library, every aspect of a setter's game is covered in this series of drills, including mechanics, movement and emergency techniques.

    Setting Mechanics

    In these drills, the setter works on hand positioning, body positioning, and setting different locations at the net. The drills are geared towards training a setter's basic fundamentals, which in turn will help your setters become more consistent. Your players will focus on hand positioning, setting to various positions on the net, masking the set, good decision making and jump setting. The "Reverse the Flow" drill practices a skill most setters don't utilize: setting opposite of the pass. This drill will train your setters to become more unpredictable as they set balls in the opposite direction of the pass.

    Movement Drills

    Your players will use more game-like skills in this set of drills, as they begin setting while moving. Setters must know how to get into position to set consistent, hittable balls. Every possible setting scenario is covered in this series of drills, including how to get to target, how to move to get under a ball, the serve receive release, covering hitters and transitioning from defensive positions. The "Set, Cover, Dig, Set" series is a great sequence that covers what a setter should do in an average offensive possession. Covering a hitter can often be overlooked by setters, but in this series it is etched into your players' brains as they are also work on moving, setting, and digging.

    Emergency Moves

    Your setters will learn how to take balls tight to the net, off the net and off target in this video segment. Even though they are labeled as emergency moves, setters face these situations many times during a typical match. You'll also learn how to teach the spin move, various types of tilt sets, balls into the net and how to attack tightly-passed balls. The "Setter Dump" drill series covers every type of attack a setter could use, explains why each attack is effective and also goes over when the best time is to use them.

    Coaches of all levels will benefit from the drills and skills showcased in this video. Improving the game play of your setters will instantly improve the play of your entire team.

    104 minutes. 2015.


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    with Cliff Hastings,
    Parkland College Head Coach;
    Back-to-Back NJCAA DII National Champions (2015-16) - finished a perfect 57-0 in 2015;
    Back-to-Back NJCAA DII National Champion Runner-up (2013-14); 8x Mid-West Athletic Conference Champions (2009-16);
    Director of the Prime Time Volleyball Club (IL)

    Cliff Hastings has amassed an impressive .905 winning percentage in nearly a decade as the head coach at Parkland College. His efforts led to back-to-back NJCAA D-II National Championships in 2015 & 2016 (following back-to-back NJCAA D-II National Championship runner-ups in 2013 & 2014) and it's clear that Hastings knows what it takes to build a winning program.

    In this video, you'll see Coach Hastings cover his essentials for team defense. He focuses on back row play, collaborative drills, and improving control to help you boost the effectiveness of your team in the defensive portion of the game.

    Back Row Position Qualities

    Each back-row position is unique such that the outside positions move forward and backward most frequently while the middle-back defender performs more side-to-side movements. We should put our players in the back-row position that they are most likely to succeed in. You'll see Coach Hastings cover a number of topics, including:

    • Why it's important for coaches to know their players and to understand the best way to use them effectively in the back row.
    • Warm-ups that include segments where players pass the ball while moving forward and backward. Alternatively, they can focus on the side-to-side skill that is needed from the middle-back position.
    • The Shuffle Passing drill, which is used to focus on footwork and maintaining good body control.
    • Having players self-evaluate the skills being taught and putting them into practical game-like situations to improve performance and skill level.
    • The Knee-pad drill, which is used to make sure players pass with the chest up, hips forward and in a neutral position at impact.

    6-on-6 Collaborative Drills

    With this video, you will learn how to incorporate collaborative drills into your team practices to gain a clear picture of what you should cover the most with your defense. Too often, coaches lose sight of the simple things when they go into attack mode and miss out on making the little changes needed to be successful in defending every aspect of an offense. You will see:

    • The Backpedal drill, which is used to force the passer to exit the court after a good pass by backpedaling.
    • The 6-on-6 Setter Dump drill, in which points are scored only when the setter dumps the ball untouched to the other side of the net. This is a great way to observe how well a defense moves to the ball on setter dumps.
    • Ways to decide which defense to run and who does what on defense in a variety of conditions.
    • The 6-on-6 Overpass drill that allows teams to focus on where they should position themselves in the event of an overpass.

    Control Drills

    Control drills will allow you to see and coach a ton of defense. Coach Hastings guides you through how to build a high-caliber defense and shows:

    • How a coach or manager can fill the 6-person role to run the collaborative drills when your team is short on players.
    • Why blocking middle hitters isn't a 'cookie cutter' approach. Coaches need to understand which offensive players are most effective and how to play defense with the percentages. For instance, if an offense has a good weakside hitter, you may want to cheat the double-block in that direction.

    When coaching volleyball, it's important to understand the considerations for establishing a team defense. This video from Coach Hastings will guide you through a systematic approach to incorporating collaborative drills and skills into your practice regimen.

    60 minutes. 2019.


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    with Ryan McGuyre,
    Baylor University Head Women's Volleyball Coach;
    2017 Big 12 Coach of the Year; Back-to-back-to-back NCAA Tournaments in '16, '17, '18 (first time in school history!);
    former Cal Baptist University Men's & Women's Head Coach;
    9x National Champions; NCCAA Division I National Coach of the Year (2011);
    Named AVCA's Men's & Women's NAIA National Coach of the Year in the same year (2010)

    In this video, Baylor University head coach Ryan McGuyre covers the fundamentals needed for coaches to get their players to become more dynamic attackers. This includes working on more deceptive and effective shots that will result in a higher kill percentage for your attackers.

    Concepts Critical to Attacking

    The foundation for the attack begins with proper footwork. Coach McGuyre teaches how footwork should look from small, to big, to even bigger steps and from a slow, to faster, to fastest pace. The first step begins when the ball is in the setter's hands. Once players can repeat the correct footwork, they can look at the double arm lift. While teaching the double arm lift, coaches should see relaxed arms out in front, then back by the player's side, and finally up by their side.

    Through a series of progressive drills, McGuyre takes you through the process of training your hitters in the fundamentals of attacking, as well as some higher-level drills on how to become a more deceptive hitter. Some of the principles that Coach McGuyre teaches to make your players more dynamic hitters include:

    • Elevate - Learn to hit over the block.
    • Annihilate - Power the ball through the block.
    • Locate - Find the open spot on the court.
    • Variate - Change up your hitting locations.
    • Humiliate - Don't allow blocker to read your attack.

    Hitting Techniques

    McGuyre teaches the elements of attacking the ball with precision. The cut is performed with a thumbs-up attack that works well for hitting down the line on an outside attack. The wrist away works in opposition to the line shot and is an effective tool for an outside hitter used to scramble up the defenders. One way to incorporate the cut and wrist away attacks is to use only these two attacking methods during practice sessions.

    Whether your team is big or small, it's essential for your hitters to have a full bag of shots from which to choose. McGuyre teaches how to help your hitters better understand the little things they can do to improve their dynamic attacks. There are many ways to attack the ball and part of being a dynamic attacker is being able to draw upon all of these hitting tools in combination.

    Practice Drills

    Finally, you'll see McGuyre break his athletes into three equal teams with a Queen of the Court concept, rotating after sideouts. The Jungle Ball drill requires attackers to only use pre-named attack techniques. This blocked training creates game-like situations for hitters to work on being more dynamic. The final round of Jungle Ball includes a "Whatever it Takes" segment where the attacker can use their whole bag of shots to create a dynamic offense. This is a great way to challenge attackers to tool the block, to be unpredictable and to work on all of their attack skills.

    When coaching volleyball, it's important to understand the full range of attacking skills that can be taught. This video from Coach McGuyre is a great reference for any coach who wants to improve the details of attacking for their team!

    59 minutes. 2019.


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    with Nancy Dorsey,
    St. James Academy (KS) Head Coach;
    2015 AVCA National High School Coach of the Year;
    2015 Kansas Class 5A state champions;
    nine state titles in eleven years 2008-18 (finished runner up twice);
    2x PrepVolleyball.com National Champions (2013, 2010);
    VBM 2013 High School Team of the Year; American Family Insurance 2013 All-USA Volleyball Coach of the Year;
    won 56 straight matches from 2012-13; lost only one set in 2013 (finishing 96-1); over 420 career wins

    Use your practice time as efficiently as possible. Nancy Dorsey shows you how with a complete arsenal of fast-paced drills that are easily integrated into any high school practice plan. She also shares several progressions and adjustments for different levels of players.

    Using players on the court, Coach Dorsey demonstrates 11 drills that touch on all aspects of the game. She shows drills that get players involved and moving throughout the entire practice. She makes every drill competitive to simulate a game-like situation, and conditions the players through the various drills. Coach Dorsey explains how each drill can be simplified for less experienced players or made more challenging for advanced players.

    Coach Dorsey shows six drills that focus on passing skills. These drills give passers multiple reps, passing in all different types of situations. Players are pushed out of their comfort zones as they compete in drills where a specific goal must be achieved. These drills pit passers against passers, and servers against passers. Some are done cooperatively to teach players how to work together to accomplish a common purpose. As an added value, these drills condition players, saving time in practice where conditioning sessions usually take place.

    The next segment of drills, which works the offense and defense together, focuses on the attacking aspect of the game while having the defense work against the hitters. These drills also give players a chance to practice multiple positions on the floor, defensively and offensively.

    Coach Dorsey explains that scrimmaging without a purpose in practice will not help players improve. She introduces a game called Baseball that challenges teams in all six rotations while keeping things extremely fun. This drill provides the same intensity as scrimmaging but in a more purpose-driven way allowing coaches opportunities to stop the action and make points and corrections.

    This presentation single-handedly gives coaches a complete practice that involves all players and all aspects of the game. Players get an incredibly powerful conditioning workout while being pushed to their limits.

    111 minutes. 2014.


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    with Bond Shymansky, University of Iowa Head Coach;
    former Marquette University Head Coach; 2013 Big East Champs;
    former Georgia Tech Head Volleyball Coach; 2004 ACC Coach of the Year

    Developing young volleyball players requires quality reps and touches in a practice. Many videos give you a lot of drills, but in High Energy, High Rep Practice Drills, Bond Shymansky also delivers the when, the why, and the strategy behind each drill.

    These drills will create a practice atmosphere that will increase your players' volleyball IQ, maintain high energy, maximize ball touches and increase the competitiveness of your team.

    Warm Up Drills

    "Triangle Pepper," an alternative to two-player pepper, trains players to defend, set, and hit at game-like angles and it replicates game-like movement and communication. "Cross-Net Pepper" will have your players working on communication, blocking, and covering the hitter - before practice even begins!

    Situational Drills and Games

    The true value of this video comes in the situational drills and games. These brilliant drills demonstrate how to teach specific offensive and defensive concepts while ratcheting up the level of competitiveness in the gym.

    Coach Shymansky shows you how he addresses all aspects of the game through his progression of drills, including:

    • Skill drills to train directional hitting and transition offense off of free balls, tips and attacks.
    • Situational drill sets that provide many repetitions in game-like situations.
    • Side-out drills that train effective performance in pressure situations.
    • Point-scoring drills that instill aggressiveness and reinforce scoring in bunches.
    • Goal-based drills to increase the "volleyball IQ" of your players.

    Competitive Drills and Games

    Run competitive drills and games that are fun and engaging for your players and simple to execute with as few as ten players and one coach. You'll learn how to make the drills more difficult as the team becomes comfortable with what they are doing and how Coach Shymansky uses the scoreboard during practice to mimic game situations. The scoring systems are easy to understand and there is always a clear winner.

    Without question this is one of the finest videos to date covering how to teach and encourage competitive play in the gym. With this arsenal of drills, you can run an efficient and effective practice that will effectively prepare your team for game time!

    This video was definitely 5 stars! I had a great time reviewing this one! My first day of practice with my team starts Monday, and I can't wait to incorporate some of the FANTASTIC drill and concepts I have learned looking at (this video)! - B. Davis, HS Volleyball Coach

    101 minutes. 2013.


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    with John Dunning,
    former Stanford University Head Women's Volleyball Coach;
    2016 NCAA National Champions - 5x National Championship Coach (2016, '04, '05 at Stanford, 1985-86 at Pacific);
    Distinguished member of the AVCA Hall of Fame (2011);
    2001 AVCA National Coach of the Year; 4x Pac-12 Coach of the Year; over 800 career wins

    Pull up a front row seat and watch John Dunning teach all aspects of volleyball! Explore the inner-workings of Dunning's time-tested and legendary system of success - and learn how you can incorporate it into your program!

    This extensive DVD set includes more than five hours of volleyball instruction, including six sessions over three days of practice. As an added bonus, experience Dunning's "freshman only session" that gives you a front row seat to the indoctrination process of transitioning athletes into the Stanford program.

    Practice Breakdown:
    Day 1:

    • Freshman only session.
    • Practice 1 - Includes a skill set focus on passing, setting, middle footwork, and block and hit transition.
    • Practice 2 - Full team session includes intensive skill development, team defense, and introduction of the offense.

    Day 2:

    • Practice 1 - Includes reading and passing form, ball control, footwork and blocking for middles, hitting from platforms, and much more.
    • Practice 2 - A more intense, physically demanding practice with numerous contacts to improve ball control.

    Day 3:

    • Practice 1 - A physically demanding practice that includes high repetitions of defensive movements and concepts.
    • Practice 2 - Scrimmaging. This practice is a dress rehearsal for game day. Dunning shares his tactics for incorporating scrimmages into practice to best simulate a game-day scenario.

    This DVD set covers nearly every facet of how John Dunning approaches teaching and playing the game. You will get an "all-access" look at how he teaches the skills, drills, and strategies that have earned him legendary coaching status!

    Order now and take the first step in integrating these proven techniques and coaching methods into your program!

    308 minutes (3 DVDs). 2011.

    All Access videos are designed to allow viewers from all over the world to see how successful coaches run their practices in a "live" practice setting. All Access videos allow viewers to see the practices un-edited and in real-time. You will see how top coaches run their drills, interact with their team and staff, how they motivate their team, the cue words they use, the atmosphere of the practice and how practices are structured from day to day. Many coaches visit successful colleges and high schools to watch practice. But if you live out of state or out of the country, visiting another coach's gym can be costly. That's why we created the All Access Practice Series of videos -- to bring the practices to you!


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    with Joe Sagula, University of North Carolina Head Coach;
    800+ career wins;
    2016 ACC Coach of the Year,
    5x ACC Coach of the Year;
    7x ACC Champions;
    4x AVCA Regional Coach of the Year

    Joe Sagula unveils an entire series of training drills especially for liberos and defensive specialists. He presents over 20 unconventional, fast-paced and fun individual and game-action training drills that will keep your defensive players from getting stale.

    Coach Initiated Drills
    Coach Sagula begins with basic individual drills that focus on the techniques and mechanics associated with the libero position. Your players will get a significant number of repetitions while working on their defensive posture, vision, instincts, reaction, movement and ball control. Overall, 13 drills are introduced in this section alone. Each one focuses on small aspects of what a libero needs, creating a total package. All of these drills are initiated by the coach who tosses or hits balls at the libero, giving quality feedback along the way. This creates a slower-paced atmosphere that allows defensive players to focus on their posture and the techniques of digging.

    Player Initiated Drills
    Running player initiated drills makes the drills more game-like and also helps other position players by allowing them to gain serving, setting or hitting reps. These drills will help your players build their communication skills, which in turn helps them improve their relationships during on-court play. These drills are a little more intense and game-like, requiring multiple skills to be used by multiple players.

    Many of the drills work the relationship between the libero and back row setter as they defend out of the back row together. Your players will improve their space relationships and become more comfortable working with each other in serve receive. This is valuable for teams that run a 5-1 offense or 6-2 when the front row setter gets subbed out for an attacker.

    Team Drills
    Coach Sagula brings all the skills from previous drills together in a game-like situation through a series of 6-on-6 drills. Players compete for points while focusing on certain parts of a libero's game. The "Bounce Plus One" drill is a wash drill that works a team's out-of-system and in-system play. Different players are forced to set a second ball and run the offense. At the same time hitters get great opportunities to work on their transition.

    Order now and give your defensive specialists and liberos the quality reps and drill variety they need to stay engaged in practice and the tools they need to succeed on game day.

    77 minutes. 2015.


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    VD-02231A: with Bond Shymansky, University of Iowa Head Coach;
    former Marquette University Head Coach; 2013 Big East Champs;
    former Georgia Tech Head Volleyball Coach; 2004 ACC Coach of the Year

    In this information packed 3-section video, Bond Shymansky shares the ball control skills and drills designed to develop your elite players. Coach Shymansky's instructional methodology includes simple verbal cue sequences to assist in the technique instruction. Following each part of this video, Shymansky breaks down game footage showing how the skills are implemented in game settings. Part 1: Setting - Technical instruction on "small hop" jump setting, spin setting, reverse direction setting, side spin setting, and setter attack jump sets. Part 2: Passing - Break down of non-linear passing, drop step passing, and hand passing. With passing instruction, Shymansky includes demonstration along with detailed rationale for helping a player and coach chose the appropriate pass at the appropriate time. Part 3: Defense - Shymansky focuses on digging technique and skills to extend the range of digging defense. Skills included are extensions, floor moves with hands digging, and one-handed digging.

    90 minutes. 2004.



    VD-02231B: with Bond Shymansky, University of Iowa Head Coach;
    former Marquette University Head Coach; 2013 Big East Champs;
    former Georgia Tech Head Volleyball Coach; 2004 ACC Coach of the Year

    In this comprehensive 3-section video, Bond Shymansky shares the arm swing skills expertise that has catapulted Georgia Tech Volleyball into national prominence! In all of the instruction, Coach Shymansky follows a pattern of showing the entire skill, breaking down the skill into components, and re-building the entire skill. Game footage included allows you to see these skills in a competitive situation. Part 1: Hitting - Break down of hitting components for middle and outside attackers with straight-on and cross-body arm swings. Also included are the roll shot, the deep tip, and the sweep shot. Part 2: Serving - Both the aggressive float serve and the jump serve are taught. Shymansky builds both of these serves from the ground up using drills and techniques that offer you an easy-to-follow teaching progression. Part 3: Blocking - Shymansky details the technique and instructional methodology for solo blocking and the swing block. He begins with set-up positions followed by lead-up drill progressions that lead to blocking skill perfection.

    70 minutes. 2004.




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